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'Group Show' by Joshua Abelow at Real Pain Fine Arts, Los Angeles

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Do Beavis and Butthead foreshadow the existence of Donald Trump the way, say, Ubu Roi prefigures the existence of Philip Guston’s Nixon? Or maybe they are all one and the same thing, variations on a theme, (slightly) different incarnations of the same monster? I remember being seized by a stark existential dread when first encountering Beavis and Butthead on MTV. It had less to do with the thought, “So it has come to this,” than with the bewildering lack of surprise occasioned by their advent in the world. They seemed somehow inevitable, of the order of fate, a curse–ancient, Greek, and yet, inscrutable, like an abstraction. The inverse of hubris, they effortlessly sought to remind me of my basest instincts, my meanest, most un-celebratable self.

Every time I tune into the pettiness of Donald Trump, his colossal self-centeredness, I am reminded of not what a monster, but actually how human he is. Or if not human, then Id-like. Indeed, one could say that he is pure injured Id, ungoverned by any real coherent ego, and wholly ignorant of the remotest notion of super-ego. Not that a Freudian equation would necessarily remedy or justify his existence in the world, but, as much as I hate to admit it, he is definitely in me. Or I in him. And in all of us. Hence his timelessness. His parodic atemporality. For he is a parody. “Always already” a parody, this man, this spiritually squalid and abject crime of a human being, is always waiting to remind us that he is standing much closer to us than many of us are willing to admit. In fact, he is right there.

So is Beavis. And Butthead. 

— Chris Sharp

21.9.19 — 12.11.19

Real Pain Fine Arts

'Microorganisms & Their Hosts' by Mindaugas Gapševičius at Atletika, Vilnius

'Managing Emotions' by Olga Pedan at Neuer Essener Kunstverein, Essen

Play / Cognition (بازی / تمرین) at Solo Show, Online

'Memory' by Kaspars Groševs, Marta Trektere at 427, Riga

'Untitled (MOLLY HOUSE)', a Group Show Curated by Julius Pristauz at EXILE, Vienn

Garden Cult Triennale, Chapter II: Baden-Baden, Germany

'Power must grow, if it doesn't grow it rots' by Dominika Trapp at Karlin Studios

'Flags' by Troels Wörsel at C.C.C., Copenhagen

☼ by chukwumaa + Zoë Argires at New Works, Chicago

'By working the soil we cultivate the skies' by KINDERSPIELE at Macao, Milan

'Sunshine' by Kanrec Sakul at VUNU Gallery, Košice

'DID YOU KISS THE SPOT TO MAKE IT WELL – A tribute to Jadran Sturm (1957-2019)' a

'Mostra collettiva di pittura da Sasha', a Group Show in Corso Brescia 23, Turin

'Multiplexx' by Hélène Fauquet at Schiefe Zähne, Berlin

'SLAG' by Marco Ceroni at GALLLERIAPIU, Bologna

'GLOBAL CRISES – Kunst & Klimata' by Tilman Hornig & Daniel Schramm at C. Rockefe

'Tonguing the fence' by Rebecca Ackroyd at Lock Up International, London

Bronte Stolz at Discordia, Melbourne

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